It Should Happen To You, 1954

“It isn’t just make a name for yourself, it’s making your name stand for something.” – Pete Sheppard (Jack Lemmon) to Gladys (Judy Holliday)

This movie. Oh how I love this movie…

In addition to starring Judy Holliday, It Should Happen To You is Jack Lemmon’s first leading role. Peter Lawford also makes an appearance as Evan Adams III. It’s a romantic comedy that was directed by George Cukor and written by Garson Kanin for Columbia Pictures. I needed this movie this week and wanted to point out that taking an 86-minute break with Judy Holliday and Jack Lemmon can work a little magic on a drained soul.

Gladys Glover (Holliday) wants to be famous. She’s convinced herself that achieving fame is the most important thing in life and will earn her the respect and money she thinks she needs to be happy. When she loses her modeling job, because she was “3/4” to large around the waste for the girdle she was modeling, she realizes that may never happen for her. She gets desperate.

As is her way, Gladys takes her shoes off so she can “think about it” all and heads into Central Park for a walk. After being fired from her modeling job for being too big, she takes joy in walking in the park and feeding the pigeons. But, notices how rude people in New York can be. She feels pretty grim about the future.

Then, she meets Pete Sheppard (Lemmon), a documentary filmmaker working on a project in the park. They instantly hit it off. The chemistry here is obvious right away. As the two talk, we see just how much her quest for fame has taken over Gladys’s mind. Pete listens, but makes it clear that he thinks it’s ridiculous. The spark between the two is evident, even though they have different views about it all.

They have a good talk that first day, then:

“Good luck to you, Gladys. I sure hope you make a name for yourself, if that’s what you want. If that’s what you really want, you’ll get it.” – Pete

How?”- Gladys

“I don’t know. Just a theory of mine: that not only ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way’… but, ‘where’s there’s a way, there’s a will’. See?” Pete.

Gladys walks home to her apartment, with her shoes off and this on her mind. It’s when she walks past a blank billboard that what Pete said hits her; “where there’s a will there’s a way.” She decides to rent the billboard and have her name painted on it. Gladys heads to the advertising agency listed on the sign. It’s gonna cost $210 a month, with a three month minimum. We already know she has saved $1000 so she signs a lease on it.

After she has “Gladys Glover” painted in large letters on the once vacant sign for no reason but to see her name there, the Adams Soap Company,  and Evan Adams III (Peter Lawford) enter the picture. Seems that Gladys’s sign is the same billboard the Adams company always uses, only they’d forgotten to renew the lease for it. To get it back, they make Gladys all kinds of offers.

After several days and several offers from the Adams Soap Company, Evan Adams’ attempt to seduce her and a final offer of six other signs for this one, Gladys takes the deal for the six signs. Things start to happen right away for no reason at all, other than people recognize her name from the signs.  All of a sudden, Gladys is offered TV spots, radio spots, and her own Adams soap campaign. Meanwhile, Pete is watching it all, from the apartment he leased down the hall from Gladys’s to be closer to her. He’s not happy about any of her new found “fame:”

“It’s better if your name stands for something on one block than if it stands for nothing over the entire world,” Pete says to her. “What’s the point of being above the crowd and not a part of it.”

I love that.

This movie is a joy to discover. It’s so much fun. Judy Holliday, as always, is pure bliss to watch. She’s amazing. I can never find the right words to capture her….it feels good to watch her in all of her movies. She can and does deliver lines like no one else. She is the perfect Gladys. And Jack Lemmon. Wow. I just can’t find the right words….


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