Now, Voyager (1942) Based on the Book by Olive Higgins Prouty (1941)


Starring Bette Davis, Claude Rains and Paul Henreid
Directed by Irving Rapper
for Warner Brothers, 1942

Charlotte Vale (Bette Davis) is a frumpy, worthless, irrelevant human being. At least that’s what her vicious bully of a mother, Mrs. Henry Vale (Gladys Cooper) has convinced Charlotte to believe. Hell, this woman has the entire house living in fear, not just her children, but the butlers and servants too. She’s a real piece of work….

Charlotte was doing well living up to what Mrs. Vale told her she was too. Until one day, when her mother asked Dr. Jacquith (Claude Rains), to come and help her daughter get over her “condition,” (which Mrs. Vale has already determined was a nervous breakdown). Dr. Jacquith was quick to see what was happening and knew what he had to do. He used kindness and encouragement…and a stay at a sanitarium…to help relieve Charlotte’s pain so she could start to live.

Charlotte wasn’t used to being treated this well, but with Dr. Jacquith’s help, she begins a transformation that saves the rest of her life.

As it turned out, time away from the old bag was exactly what Charlotte needed….

Now, Voyager
by Olive Higgins Prouty
340 Pages
Houghton Mifflin, 1942
Triangle Books 2004 Paperback edition: ISBN: 1558614761 (ISBN13: 9781558614765)

Both book and movie document Charlotte’s transformation. Both are satisfying, (especially for some of us that have mothers similar to Mrs. Henry Vale) and both reveal the same life lesson. I’m glad I read the book before I ever saw the movie though, because I felt like I knew Charlotte better than the movie let me get to know her. That’s not to say Bette Davis isn’t brilliant as Charlotte, of course she is, but we’re just closer to Charlotte and what she’s feeling in the book. For me, that was a good thing. Even though the movie follows the book closely, there’s more details in the book that took me to another level of closeness to Charlotte and how she dealt with her feelings. There’s no doubt that the book allowed me a greater appreciation for her…and for the movie.

As I write this, I’m tired. I’m worn out from the stresses of the last year and I can’t imagine having the strength and energy Charlotte exudes in this journey of self-discovery she’s on. She desperately wanted to feel better and even though she was afraid at first, she found the energy to overcome the fear and go for it. Davis makes this energy infectious and inspiring in the movie. I’d first seen the movie years ago, but after watching it again recently it sparks an energy in me that I had all but given up on.

On the outside chance you’ve never seen the movie or read the book, I don’t want to give away too many more story details here because this story is worth discovering without me butting in with how it affected me. Just know that it did. In a very good way. I suspect both Now, Voyager the book and the movie might be a story we all relate to in different ways, because the basic issue is insecurity and overcoming the damage it can do.


4 thoughts on “Now, Voyager (1942) Based on the Book by Olive Higgins Prouty (1941)

  1. A truly amazing transformation here for Bette Davis’s character – and I’m not just talking about the clothes and the eyebrows. 😉 Davis-as-Charlotte exudes more confidence and purpose after she flees her mother’s toxicity. It’s a film to make you stand up and cheer.

  2. A bonafide classic. I’m surprised that they aren’t a bunch of remakes out-there. The themes of the book are timeless. Maybe a mini-series about the Vale saga (I believe Prouty wrote four or five books about the family).

    1. Good point, why aren’t there remakes? Hmmm. You’re right, these stories are timeless. I LOVE the idea of a mini-series! Prouty wrote some amazing things, like these five novels and Stella Dallas.

      Thanks for this!

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