The Thin Man, 1934

The Thin Man (1934, MGM) is a movie that doesn’t need another review or description written about it. Heck, even here on this blog I’ve already written about it here, and here and the blog is only a few months old.  Classic movie bloggers have read and/or written so many articles about it over the years, and I’ll never get tired of reading them. I just needed to say a little something about it here (again) because it is the one movie, along with its 5 sequels, that I will think about constantly for the rest of my life. Just the thought of these movies overwhelms me with happiness. It’s exactly the kind of thing I need right now. The Thin Man has always had the power to move my mood to a happier place. It never disappoints, always keeps me riveted no matter how many times I’ve seen it and never fails to provide me a happy place to escape to. Right now, it seems I need these things more than ever before, and I can vouch for the fact that Bill and Myrna can provide them.

The Thin Man wasn’t the first “old” movie I ever saw, His Girl Friday was. Hell, it wasn’t even the first Thin Man movie I ever saw, but it was the movie that got me hooked on all six of them for a lifetime. Finding it was a happy accident; I was a teenager and my Grandmother had just introduced me to Jimmy Stewart with Anatomy of a Murder. I loved it, and immediately began a quest to watch every Jimmy Stewart movie I could find because…..Jimmy Stewart! Duh! I checked out several of his movies at the library that same week. The first one I watched? After The Thin Man,1936 – the second movie in the six movie Thin Man series.  At that moment, I totally forgot about the quest to see every Jimmy Stewart movie.

“I’m a hero. I was shot twice in the Tribune,” Mr. Charles said.
“I read you were shot 5 times in the tabloids,” Mrs. Charles said.
“That’s not true, he didn’t come anywhere near my tabloids.”

That kind of banter continues through the film. It’s fun and funny. Oh yes, there’s a murder investigation going on too, but for my money it’s the chemistry between Myrna Loy and William Powell that is the main attraction. It’s the star of every movie they’ve done together (14 of them total). When I see them together in a movie I ache for more. The love and respect they have for each other is always on display and it feels good to be in the presence of it.

There’s no doubt that the script of The Thin Man is helped by having the married couple Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich adapt Dashiell Hammett’s book to the screen for it, but it seems like so much of the dialogue is naturally Loy and Powell. Great lines in a movie are one thing, but real chemistry between the actors like this is something else altogether. In my opinion, that’s what takes the movie to a higher level. Together, Bill and Myrna put their chemistry to work in creating an environment I crave to be in. The Thin Man still makes me laugh out loud even after seeing it dozens of times. Spending 90 minutes with this movie is the easiest way I can think of to cheer me up,. Today, being able to gain that from something as simple as a 90 minute, 86-year-old movie means more than it ever did before.

While it’s obvious the Loy and Powell friendship off screen (they were never romantically involved according to Myrna Loy’s autobiography) enhanced their ability to create this kind of magic on screen, it is also a testament to the talent they both possess. They play off of each other with an ease that I’ve never seen in any other onscreen couple (sorry Bogey and Bacall, Hepburn and Tracy). It’s effortless every time and a joy to watch.

I always say I was born 50 years too late because it seems like I would feel so much more comfortable back in the day of Loy, Powell and The Thin Man but then I remember that I wouldn’t be able to watch them over and over again as many times as I want to like I can today. Would I really want to give that up? Probably.

“Those were the good old days,” –party guest
“Don’t kid yourself, these are the good old days.” –Nick Charles to his party guests.

I’m writing this in the middle of a long overdue racial uprising and the Covid-19 pandemic, so it’s hard to absorb this line the way I did the first time I heard Nick say it. I remember the hopeful feeling that came over me back then, but it’s hard to let myself feel that right now.  Honestly, I’m currently leading more toward the “those were the good old days” line from the party guest. . At the very least, Nick and Nora will always be here to make it all better for at least an hour or two and don’t think I’m not relying heavily on them for that right now.  So yeah, more posts about The Thin Man are always welcome. Please post a link to yours below.

“How many drinks have you had?” – Nora to Nick
“This will make six Martinis.” – Nick replies.
“Fine”>[to the waiter] All right. Will you bring me five more Martinis, Leo? Line them right up here.

It couldn’t hurt.

Myrna Loy: Being and Becoming by Myrna Loy
iMDB

New To Me This Week, The Petrified Forest, 1936

The Petrified Forest, 1936
Directed by Archie Mayo for Warner Brothers
Based on the play by Robert E. Sherwood
Starring Leslie Howard, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart

“I had to come all this way to find a reason,” – Alan Squier (Leslie Howard)

I know, I know. I’m ashamed. Embarrassed. Disgusted with myself that I never saw this movie until last week. I am a failure at classic movies. I must do better! BUT, I found it this week and I can sincerely say The Petrified Forest has leapt to the top of my list of my all-time favorite movies. It’s a special movie and I love it.

Leslie Howard and Bette Davis

I’ve never loved Bette Davis more. Honestly, I’ve never really loved Bette at all, which is probably one of the reasons this movie hasn’t been viewed by me until now. Again. Embarrassing! Pathetic! Bette Davis’s performance in The Petrified Forest has me rethinking my avoidance of her movies. She’s remarkable here as Gabrielle, (Gabby), Maple, the daughter of Jason Maple (Porter Hall), the owner of the diner where the entire movie takes place.  I simply adore her. Gabby is a sweetheart with big dreams and fantasies about going to Paris to find herself. She is so consumed by these dreams that we catch her planning for Gramps (Charley Grapewin) to pass on so she and her father can sell the diner and get her the money she needs to finally go to France. Ok, so not exactly a sweetheart here. The point is she’s is desperate to leave the desert with no real way out.

Leslie Howard as Alan Squier

Alan Squier (Howard) is an intellectual realist that carries the weight of the meaning of the movie on his shoulders. It’s in good hands. (Leslie Howard is just flat out perfect for this role). Alan has hitchhiked his way across the desert after a failed marriage and no career prospects…”looking for something.” He stops at the diner to eat, even though he has no money. He and Gabby immediately ignite sparks. His poetic language melts Gabby.

“What are you looking for?” Gabby asks.

“I don’t know. I suppose I was looking for something to believe in. Worth living for. Worth dying for, “Alan replies.

It doesn’t take long for Gabby to see him as an escape from the life she so desperately wants to put behind her. She’s never met anyone like him and somehow sees a future for the two of them, even though he hints that he’s ready to die. He’s the first person to ever listen to her dreams seriously.

“I know there’s something in you. I’m trying to figure out what it is,” Alan says.

“There’s something in me that wants something different (than the desert). Maybe it’s the French in my blood. You know, sometimes I feel like I was sparkling all over and I want to go out and do something absolutely crazy and marvelous. Then the American part of me speaks up and spoils everything. Then I go back to work and figure out my dull accounts,” Gabby replies.

She’s down, but hopeful, while Alan is depressed with every aspect of his life. It prevents him from mustering the energy to start a relationship with Gabby, though he’d like to. Instead, he heads out the door and back to his journey west. Gabby hitches a ride for him with the Chisolms (Paul Harvey and Genevieve Tobin), customers and the diner, and their chauffeur. She wanted to go with him, but she expected him to go without her. She knew she was tuck in the desert and Alan was just one more chance to change her life and get out of it. Like her other dreams, it wasn’t going to get a chance to work out. It’s clear that she’s used to disappointments like this.

We’re introduced to Duke Mantee (Humphrey Bogart) not long after Alan and the Chisolms leave the diner. And I mean, yikes! Duke is a guy that’s mad as hell and clearly has some deep problems himself. Duke and his gang are accused of several murders and the law is after them. They’re dangerous and on the lam. Not good. When Duke’s car breaks down on the highway, he and his gang points their guns at the Chishom car when it passes them and forces them out of it so he and his gang can steal it. They quickly head in the direction of the diner. Alan realizes he needs to get back to warn everyone.

Gabby, Mantee’s Tough Guy, Boze, Alan as diner hostages.

Mantee holds them all hostage until his mysterious Doris finds them and helps them escape. The movie starts to feel a lot like Key Largo here and that’s just fine with me. This is where the conversations about their places in life begin. Everyone is conversing with everyone else and it’s intriguing to witness where they think they all stand, and ultimately where that way of thinking has taken them in life.

Humphrey Bogart in his break-out movie role as Duke Mantee.

As Mantee sits around and broods a lot, presumably because he hasn’t heard from Doris (whom we never see). Alan thinks out loud about every human condition evident in the room and beyond. A lot of human psychology is processed and the meaning of idealism is explored in depth. It made me think. It inspired me. It all comes together in a dramatic ending. One of two endings that were shot, but this is the ending Howard wanted, and even had written into his contract to make sure he got it.

The Petrified Forest is based on a Broadway play by Robert E. Sherwood. Leslie Howard and Humphrey Bogart both starred in the play in the same roles they play here. When it came time to cast the movie, Leslie Howard demanded Bogart be cast too. At that point, Bogie hadn’t made his break in movies yet, so this was a big deal to him. The studio gave Bogart the part at Howard’s request and it turned out to be his break-out role. He and wife Lauren Bacall thanked Leslie Howard later by naming their daughter Leslie after him.

I never spill spoilers and I won’t do it here either, even though I’m probably the last person in classic movie fandom to see this one. I really could go on and on about this movie, but I won’t. Discovering it was a happy surprise to me and it was pure joy to watch. I’m especially pleased to have found a role I like Bette Davis in. I always knew I was supposed to like her and admire her talent, but she just wasn’t an actress that drew me to movies like Myrna or Katharine. This movie has changed that and I will seek her movies out for more “new to me” classic films to watch.

“I had to come all this way to find a reason.”

The Petrified Forest Movie Poster

It Should Happen To You, 1954

“It isn’t just make a name for yourself, it’s making your name stand for something.” – Pete Sheppard (Jack Lemmon) to Gladys (Judy Holliday)

This movie. Oh how I love this movie…

In addition to starring Judy Holliday, It Should Happen To You is Jack Lemmon’s first leading role. Peter Lawford also makes an appearance as Evan Adams III. It’s a romantic comedy that was directed by George Cukor and written by Garson Kanin for Columbia Pictures. I needed this movie this week and wanted to point out that taking an 86-minute break with Judy Holliday and Jack Lemmon can work a little magic on a drained soul.

Gladys Glover (Holliday) wants to be famous. She’s convinced herself that achieving fame is the most important thing in life and will earn her the respect and money she thinks she needs to be happy. When she loses her modeling job, because she was “3/4” to large around the waste for the girdle she was modeling, she realizes that may never happen for her. She gets desperate.

As is her way, Gladys takes her shoes off so she can “think about it” all and heads into Central Park for a walk. After being fired from her modeling job for being too big, she takes joy in walking in the park and feeding the pigeons. But, notices how rude people in New York can be. She feels pretty grim about the future.

Then, she meets Pete Sheppard (Lemmon), a documentary filmmaker working on a project in the park. They instantly hit it off. The chemistry here is obvious right away. As the two talk, we see just how much her quest for fame has taken over Gladys’s mind. Pete listens, but makes it clear that he thinks it’s ridiculous. The spark between the two is evident, even though they have different views about it all.

They have a good talk that first day, then:

“Good luck to you, Gladys. I sure hope you make a name for yourself, if that’s what you want. If that’s what you really want, you’ll get it.” – Pete

How?”- Gladys

“I don’t know. Just a theory of mine: that not only ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way’… but, ‘where’s there’s a way, there’s a will’. See?” Pete.

Gladys walks home to her apartment, with her shoes off and this on her mind. It’s when she walks past a blank billboard that what Pete said hits her; “where there’s a will there’s a way.” She decides to rent the billboard and have her name painted on it. Gladys heads to the advertising agency listed on the sign. It’s gonna cost $210 a month, with a three month minimum. We already know she has saved $1000 so she signs a lease on it.

After she has “Gladys Glover” painted in large letters on the once vacant sign for no reason but to see her name there, the Adams Soap Company,  and Evan Adams III (Peter Lawford) enter the picture. Seems that Gladys’s sign is the same billboard the Adams company always uses, only they’d forgotten to renew the lease for it. To get it back, they make Gladys all kinds of offers.

After several days and several offers from the Adams Soap Company, Evan Adams’ attempt to seduce her and a final offer of six other signs for this one, Gladys takes the deal for the six signs. Things start to happen right away for no reason at all, other than people recognize her name from the signs.  All of a sudden, Gladys is offered TV spots, radio spots, and her own Adams soap campaign. Meanwhile, Pete is watching it all, from the apartment he leased down the hall from Gladys’s to be closer to her. He’s not happy about any of her new found “fame:”

“It’s better if your name stands for something on one block than if it stands for nothing over the entire world,” Pete says to her. “What’s the point of being above the crowd and not a part of it.”

I love that.

This movie is a joy to discover. It’s so much fun. Judy Holliday, as always, is pure bliss to watch. She’s amazing. I can never find the right words to capture her….it feels good to watch her in all of her movies. She can and does deliver lines like no one else. She is the perfect Gladys. And Jack Lemmon. Wow. I just can’t find the right words….

The Orpheum Theatre – Madison, Wisconsin – a Rapp and Rapp Movie Palace

Photo via the Wisconsin State Historical Society.

The Orpheum Theatre (I spell it that way because Rapp and Rapp did) in Madison, Wisconsin was designed and built over the course of 1926-1927. It officially opened to the public on March 31, 1927 with a Vaudeville show.  George Rapp and his brother Cornelius Rapp designed the Orpheum in the French Renaissance style for vaudeville shows and movies with their design philosophy in mind:

“Watch the eyes of a child as it enters the portals of our great theatres and treads the pathway into fairyland. Watch the bright light in the eyes of the tired shopgirl who hurries noiselessly over carpets and sighs with satisfaction as she walks amid furnishings that once delighted the hearts of queens. See the toil-worn father whose dreams have never come true, and look inside his heart as he finds strength and rest within the theatre. There you have the answer to why motion picture theatres are so palatial. Here is a shrine to democracy where there are no privileged patrons. The wealthy rub elbows with the poor — and are better for this contact. Do not wonder, then, at the touches of Italian Renaissance, executed in glazed polychrome terra cotta, or at the lobbies and foyers adorned with replicas of precious masterpieces of another world, or at the imported marble wainscoting or the richly ornamented ceilings with motifs copied from master touches of Germany, France, and Italy, or at the carved niches, the cloistered arcades, the depthless mirrors, and the great sweeping staircases. These are not impractical attempts at showing off. These are part of a celestial city — cavern of many-colored jewels, where iridescent lights and luxurious fittings heighten the expectations of pleasure. It is richness unabashed, but richness with a reason.” – Printed design philosophy guiding Rapp and Rapp Architects.

Photo via the Wisconsin State Historical Society.

The Orpheum was, and still is, across the street from another Rapp and Rapp-designed theater in Madison, the Capitol Theatre.  Both theatres are still in business and we’re lucky enough to visit them both often. While the Capitol Theatre has been beautifully restored and is a part of our Overture Center For the Arts, across the street the Orpheum is on a journey, of sorts, to improvement. It keeps getting better every year and provides Madison with a wonderful venue for concerts, movies and public events.

 

 

 

1927 photo by Angus McVicar

“Everyone should see and appreciate this magnificient palace of amusement.” – Mayor Albert G. Schmedeman of Madison, circa 1927.

 

The Orpheum opened on March 31, 1927 and cost close to $750,000 to build. It seated 2,400 people and was the first building in Wisconsin to have air conditioning.

A recent photo from 2019. Photorgapher unknown.

Over the years the Orpheum saw prosperity and downfalls….and prosperity again. In the course of just a couple of months in late 2004 and early 2005, there were two arson attempts, and one more years later. In 2012, the Orpheum got new management who had the will to purchase the theatre and rehab it.  In 2013, the Paras family acquired the building in a foreclosure sale and continues to work on the front facade, marquee, ticket booth, roof, interior ceiling and sidewalls, bathrooms, etc., They’ve also upgraded the heating and cooling systems. It’s nice to be able to walk in there today, and enjoy a show knowing you’re in a space that is so much like it was when it was built in 1927. I am especially thrilled to be in yet another Rapp and Rapp movie palace when I’m there!

The sign has always been an iconic site on State Street. It was changed at least twice over the years, once to remove the word “new” from the top when they replaced it with “RKO” and again in the 1960s when they “dumbed down” the sign. I’m not even gonna bother with a picture of that, yuk. But, in 2015, the owners won approval from the Madison Landmarks Commission (an exhausting feat on its own) to do an historic replication of the old sign. They spent $200,000 to return the sign to its original 1926 Rapp and Rapp design, complete with “new” on top and the racing lights. For a Rapp and Rapp architects fan and a classic movie geek like me, it’s a welcome site that I get to see, in a normal time, just about every day and I can’t tell you how wonderful that is. The Capitol Theatre sign, from the Rapp and Rapp theater across the street, is in storage at the State HIstorical Society, so the Orpheum’s sign is especially important.

Here’s some memories from the early years of the theatre (all photos are from the Wisconsin State Historical Society, except the last one, that one’s mine :):

The stage, set up for an orchestra in 1937. Photo by Angus McVicar.
Orpheum seating, 1942. Photo by George Stein.
1937 photo of the marquee advertising the movie Lost Horizon, starring Ronald Colman. Photo by Elwin Waste.
Orpheum lobby posters, 1945. Photo by Angus McVicar.
Picture of the lobby, 1927. Photo by Angus McVicar.
The projection room at the Orpheum, 1927. Photo by Angus McVicar.
Theatre seating from the stage, 1941. Photo by Elwin Waste.
Lobby posters, June, 1945. Photo by Angus McVicar.
The Bride Wore Red display at Woldenburg’s, an ad for the Orpheum’s showing of the movie in 1937. Joan Crawford’s dress from the movie can be seen in the back. Photo by Elwin Waste.
Stage set up for movies, circa 1954, Photo by Angus McVicar

While movies aren’t the mainstay of the theatre anymore, they do still show them in addition to providing us a wonderful venue for concerts and public events. If you’re ever in Madison, I recommend a visit to The Orpheum and the Capitol Theatres on State St. for a touch of Rapp and Rapp movie palace design.

photo by Sarah Owens

Sources:
The Isthmus – Madison’s Lost Theaters, January 12, 2017
Cinema Treasures
Wisconsin State Historical Society

Frank McHugh and I Love You Again, 1940

Frank McHugh

It’s Frank McHugh‘s birthday today! I suppose I could honor him by listing all of his movies, plays and TV shows, but we can get that list here. Instead, I wanted to write about the fun of watching him along side my all-time favorite onscreen pair, William Powell and Myrna Loy, in I Love You Again, 1940. I’m crazy about this movie. Powell and Loy’s, witty chemistry, combined with the genuinely lovable character McHugh brings to ‘Doc’ Ryan, makes this a perfect movie to me.

Birthday boy Francis Curray McHugh was born May 23, 1898 in Homestead, Pennsylvania. His life was devoted to acting from an early age. At 10, he started performing in his parent’s theater troupe with his sister Kitty and brother, Matt. At 17, he left his parent’s company to join the Marguerite Bryant Players. From there, he went on to be the juvenile and stage manager at the Empire Theater in Pittsburgh. He then joined the Keith and Orpheum circuits and in 1925, he debuted on Broadway in The Fall Guy.” In 1929 Frank McHugh married actress Dorothy Spencer. They had three children and remained married until his death on September 11, 1981.

It was in 1930 that Frank was hired as a contract player at Warner Brothers. From this point forward, he almost always played a version of the role he played in I Love You Again – a sweet, funny, likable sidekick to the leading actor’s character. He was pals on and off screen with dozens of actors like Humphrey Bogart, Pat O’Brien and James Cagney  McHugh holds his own with all of them, and generally steals the scenes he’s in with his comedic delivery. He does that here too.

Lobby Card, I Love You Again, 1940

I Love You Again was directed by W.S. Van Dyke II (yes, the same W.S. Van Dyke that directed the first four Thin Man Movies) for MGM in 1940. Three of my all-time favorite actors, together in a W.S. Van Dyke-directed movie is paradise for me!

Larry Wilson (Powell) is a teetotaling, stuffed-shirt, do-gooder who gets on everyone’s nerves with his cheapskate ways. We meet him as he’s sailing home on the S.S. Falkness from a business trip. He’s insufferable and we’re already sick of him a few minutes into the movie when an extremely drunk Doc Ryan (McHugh) rescues us. Ryan, clearly a troublemaker, antagonizes Wilson in the ship’s bar. Ryan is really drunk and desperate to prove to Wilson that he isn’t. To do this, he decides to walk the “tightrope” atop the railing of the ship “blindfolded.” Oh boy. Wilson tries to stop him, reminding him that he’s “inebriated” but Ryan is determined to prove he’s fine and ends up falling overboard anyway.

Larry Wilson jumps in to save Ryan’s life. When rescuers come to bring them both back aboard the ship, one of them slams an oar onto Wilson’s head. That conk on the head turns Wilson back into George Carey – the man he really is AND was before he took another blow to the head in a fight nine years earlier. Once George Carey is back, he doesn’t remember one second of his life as Larry Wilson. Meanwhile, Doc Ryan is with him and so grateful to Wilson for saving his life that he’s decided to “go straight” and commit himself to Wilson for life. Wilson, now Carey, has no idea what Ryan is talking about. Thankfully, they figure it out together for all of us…

“I’ve had amnesia. A blow to the head can make you forget your entire past. You can live on for years, maybe the rest of your life as somebody else, unless a shock or another blow brings you back to your right self.” – George Carey (William Powell)

….and once they do, they realize how much they had in common nine years ago, before that first bump on the head. As it turns out they have a grifter’s life in common and they love it. With this new common ground, they come up with a plan to milk everything they can out of Larry Wilson’s life. All those bank accounts they discovered in Larry Wilson’s wallet provoked them to get moving on to Wilson’s beloved Habersville where they planned to get away with Wilson’s fortune.

Until Kay meets them at the dock when the ship gets home. Kay is Larry Wilson’s wife. She had heard about the rescue, and even though she plans to divorce Larry and marry Herbert (Donald Douglas), she meets him to bring him home anyway. She doesn’t realize Larry doesn’t exist anymore. And George Carey doesn’t realize she’s his wife. He is stunned to learn he’s really married to her at all. Doc Ryan’s and Carey’s plan hits a wall before it ever gets started.

They rethink everything, all while Carey is trying to convince Kay to stay married to him.

Herbert (Donald Douglas), Kay (Myrna Loy), Kay’s Mother (Nella Walker), Larry/George (William Powell), Doc Ryan (Frank McHugh), Mayor Carver (Harlan Briggs)

I Love You Again is a screwball comedy. Powell and Loy are as good together as ever. Frank McHugh is fantastic. The way he smoothly delivers his lines along side the engaging chemistry of Bill and Myrna makes this movie pure joy.

I really don’t want to give away any more of the story. I Love You Again is a fun movie to discover, especially the first time. I find it so satisfying. It makes me feel good and laugh out loud and Frank McHugh is a big reason why.

I can’t love it enough!

Sources:

Frank McHugh’s New York Times Obituary
IMDb
TV Guide
TCM
New York Public Library

Frank McHugh, born on this day, 122 years ago,  in 1898

 

 

6 Favorite Movies From The 60s

May 16th is National Classic Movie Day! I love any reason to celebrate classic movies, and this is a fun way to do it. Thank you to Rick at the Classsic Film & TV Cafe for hosting this, The 6 From The 60s blogathon. The guidelines for this blogathon are simple: list your six favorite films from the 1960s and explain why they deserve such an honor! This post is my entry. I love comedies and the common thread running through these movies is that they made and still do make me laugh every time I watch them.

You can see all the blogathon entries by clicking here. I’m looking forward to seeing the other movies that have the honor of being someone’s “favorite!”

It’s no surprise that Walter Matthau shows up in three of the movies here, and that Jack Lemmon is in two of them. Watching these two just makes me so happy.

1-The Odd Couple, 1968

Why is The Odd Couple one of my favorite movies from the 60s? The friendships. It’s displayed in every scene. I see it and feel it from every character and it’s pure comfort for me. I admit, anything with Walter Matthau is good for me. Especially The Odd Couple.  From the poker game scenes, to the date with the neighbors, to the scenes with just a frustrated Oscar (Walter Matthau) and frustrated Felix (Jack Lemmon). Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon play these characters in such a way that we care about them both. Even though Felix’s neurotic nature makes us nuts, we care about what happens to him.  Even though Oscar is sloppy, we admire him and the way he carries himself. I love this movie for the kindness I see when I watch it. It’s sometimes sarcastic and playful, a little bit serious and painful, but the underlying kindness is always evident to me, even when they’re mad at each other. Despite all of the things that can and do go wrong, they all still care about each other in the end. And it’s funny as hell.

2-Cactus Flower, 1969

Why is Cactus Flower one of my favorite movies from the 60s? It’s a meaningful story chock-full of a lot of reasons to laugh from likable characters. Julian Winston (Walter Matthau), is a dentist that lies about being married to avoid commitment to marriage with Toni (Goldie Hawn). Nurse Dickinson (Ingrid Bergman) is there, thankfully, to keep Julian organized and to eventually set everything straight. All three actors, Walter Matthau, Goldie Hawn and Ingrid Bergman play off each other like they’ve done it for years….and this is Goldie Hawn’s first movie! Cactus Flower is a lot of fun!

Did I mention Ingrid Bergman was in it? She does comedy so well. I did not expect this, but oh my, is she good at it. Ingrid Bergman steals the show for me. And it’s wonderful!

3-Bachelor in Paradise, 1961

Why is Bachelor in Paradise one of my favorite movies from the 60s? It’s a gorgeous glimpse into mid-century American culture embedded in an interesting story line. I wrote about this movie here a few weeks ago because it’s always had such a positive effect on me. Lana Turner is wonderful.

From my April 10, 2020 post:

Bachelor in Paradise is light-hearted, mid-century comedy that has the power to make me laugh out loud and forget about things for a couple of hours. It’s filled with glorious mid-century decor, fashion and lifestyle. This movie doesn’t pretend to be a deep, societal observation, but there is an important feminist message here, especially for 1961, I suspect, mostly delivered to us via Bob Hope’s peppy narrating as Niles. Lana Turner’s beautiful, independent intelligence as Rosemary, along with the intelligent, thoughtful women of the neighborhood, make this one of my all-time favorite movies.

And yeah, it’s funny!

4-Charade,1963

Why is Charade one of my favorite movies from the 60’s? Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn.

The end.

5-Some Like It Hot, 1959

Why is Some Like It Hot one of my favorite movies from the 60’s? It’s rhythm. It clips along at a good pace with a plot that keeps me engaged by always wondering what in the world could possibly happen next. It’s one of the best movie-watching experiences I can think of. Paying attention to the three main characters-Joe (Tony Curtis), Jerry (Jack Lemmon), and Sugar (Marilyn Monroe) is easy because they’re all sincerely likeable and engaging. They’re good people that I find myself rooting for every time I watch this. From the first scene where Joe and Jerry  witness the Valentine’s Day Massacre in Chicago in 1929 to that sweet ending, everything that happens moves along so….perfectly? I never find myself cringing, bored or rushing to get it over with. It feels like a brave movie too, and I like that it takes chances. This movie feels like it’s been thoroughly thought out and put together so well by the director (Billy Wilder) and writers (Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond) that actors that just melt into the story. It’s perfect. But then, that’s Billy Wilder for ya.

6-The Thrill of it All, 1963

Why is The Thrill of it All one of my favorite movies from the 60s? Because Doris Day plays a character, Beverly Boyer, that comes up against sexism and still makes her own decisions in the face of it. Despite the chaos it causes her within her family, she follows her heart. That takes guts now, let alone in the 1960s. Her husband, Dr. Gerald Boyer (Garner) is not happy about any of what she decides to do, and he makes it difficult for her. Still, I love that everything that happens here is ultimately Beverly’s decision and not her husband’s. Even in the end. Some have called this movie sexist, and there is an overall atmosphere of it, but she’s successfully navigating through it on her own terms. It isn’t always fun for her and every step she takes is a challenge, but she does it, and it’s inspiring. On top of that, The Thrill of It All is hilarious!

That pool scene…..

The chemistry between Doris Day and James Garner is addictive. I wish they’d done more movies together.

Thank you to Rick at Classic Film and TV Cafe for hosting 6 From The 60s!

What’s YOUR favorite movie from the 1960s?

The Capitol Theatre – Madison, Wisconsin – Rapp and Rapp Architects

My obsession with Cornelieus Ward Rapp and George Leslie Rapp, Rapp and Rapp Architects, theatres (I spell it that way here because they did) began when we visited the Al Ringling Theatre in Baraboo, Wisconsin decades ago. I’ll eventually get to that one on Mrs. Charles too but today’s post belongs to the Capitol Theatre on State St. in Madison, Wisconsin. This is my “home theatre.” I live mere blocks from it. We’ve had a lot of great times in this theater, seeing a lot of great modern shows in this beautiful, historic space. You have no idea how grateful I am that the public stood up and screamed to stop its demolition in the 90s. Movies, concerts and plays are all a part of the Capitol Theatre’s schedule today, exactly as they were when it first opened in 1918. Believe me, we take full advantage of what this place offers today. As a classic movie fan and a Rapp and Rapp Architects fanatic who loves her city, the Capitol Theatre in Madison means so much me. It’s a special place.

I love being inside a Rapp Brothers-designed movie palace like this, not just because it’s an old movie theatre, but because just knowing the Rapp Brothers’ design philosophy behind each one of these places makes them that much more special:

Watch the eyes of a child as it enters the portals of our great theatres and treads the pathway into fairyland. Watch the bright light in the eyes of the tired shopgirl who hurries noiselessly over carpets and sighs with satisfaction as she walks amid furnishings that once delighted the hearts of queens. See the toil-worn father whose dreams have never come true, and look inside his heart as he finds strength and rest within the theatre. There you have the answer to why motion picture theatres are so palatial. Here is a shrine to democracy where there are no privileged patrons. The wealthy rub elbows with the poor — and are better for this contact. Do not wonder, then, at the touches of Italian Renaissance, executed in glazed polychrome terra cotta, or at the lobbies and foyers adorned with replicas of precious masterpieces of another world, or at the imported marble wainscoting or the richly ornamented ceilings with motifs copied from master touches of Germany, France, and Italy, or at the carved niches, the cloistered arcades, the depthless mirrors, and the great sweeping staircases. These are not impractical attempts at showing off. These are part of a celestial city — cavern of many-colored jewels, where iridescent lights and luxurious fittings heighten the expectations of pleasure. It is richness unabashed, but richness with a reason. – Rapp and Rapp Architects design philosophy

State Street, Madison, Wisconsin. The Capitol and Orpheum theatres, two Rapp and Rapp theatres, across the street from each other in downtown Madison. Yes, they’re both still there.

Rapp and Rapp Architects designed the Capitol Theatre in 1917-18 for vaudeville, silent movies and musical performances. At the time, it was a 20th Century Fox “house.” Rapp and Rapp had already been designing theatres for a few years by now, and were creating “opulent palaces” that lived up to their philosophy. In 1926, the Rapp brothers also designed the Orpheum Theatre that was built right across the street from the Capitol Theatre.

Photographs from the original construction in 1917 and 18 are scarce (let me know if you know where to find some, please!) There were, however, photographs from the 1920s renovations when the Capitol Theatre became an RKO “house:”

Capitol Theatre renovations, July 2, 1927. Photo by Angus McVicar via the Wisconsin Historical Society.
Capitol Theatre Remodeling. Photo by Angus McVicar via the Wisconsin Historical Society.
Capitol Theatre Remodeling, 1927. Photo by Angus McVicar via the Wisconsin Historical Society.
Capitol Theater ad for opening night from The Capital Times.

The Capitol Theatre’s opening night in 1918 attracted over 6,000 patrons to see Colleen Moore and Larry Kent. star in Her Wild Oat, (1927), for First National Pictures

Colleen Moore and Larry Kent publicity photograph for Her Wild Oat

In Her Wild Oat, Mary Lou Smith (Moore) owns a food wagon when she decides to take a well-earned vacation where the rich and famous gather for fun. The other guests at this beach retreat are rude and mean to her, so her reporter friend (Kent) decides to help with matters.

Have you seen it?

Interior view of the Capitol Theatre balcony in the auditorium,   Madison, Wisconsin, January 23, 1928. (Photo by Angus B. McVicar/Wisconsin Historical Society/Getty Images)
Photo by Angus McVicar via the Wisconsin Historical Society collection.
Photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society collection.
Photo by Angus McIvar from the Wisconsin Historical Society collection.

The theatre always offered movies and shows…

Evan Hughes, doorman at the Capitol Theatre, May 17, 1945. Photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society collection.

…with a full staff of doormen and ushers to take you to your seat at every performance. Yep, they still do.

Over the years the theatre thrived.

In 1980, it underwent another round of renovations when it became part of the Madison Civic Center, which also included the Oscar Mayer Theater.

In the late 1990s when the new Overture Center was being designed, the Capitol Theatre was slated for demoltion. The public outcry stopped it from happening. Thank goodness.

The first movie I saw at the Capitol Theatre was Grandma’s Boy, 1927, starring Harold Lloyd. It marked the first time I saw a silent film on the big screen. Talk about fun. The theatre was full of people laughing out loud at every joke in the movie and simply having fun. I remember feeling a sense of relief that day. And like I had finally found my tribe, as they say. This was heaven for me!

The Capitol Theatre today.

In the late 1990s, the Overture Foundation was founded and plans began for a new performing arts center. In 2004, renovations began to incorporate the Capitol Theatre into the new Overture Center for the Arts. While the original marquee is gone…

…the interior is restored and as opulent as ever. I like to think Rapp and Rapp would be pleased. In addition to other shows there, we go back for several Duck Soup Cinema showings every year. There’s usually three or four shows a year that have vaudeville acts first, the door prizes, then a full-length silent movie.

Just like those original silent movies, the Duck Soup Cinema movies are accompanied by an organist on the fully restored Grand Barton Organ which was originally built by the Barton Musical Instrument Company in Oshkosh.

When we go, for whatever show, I catch myself staring at everything around me. It’s dazzling. It doesn’t take much thought to realize that by being in this space, that  I am connected to those early theatre days Rapp and Rapp wanted us all to experience. It’s an awe-inspiring and humbling experience all at the same time.

My view for Duck Soup Cinema.

In addition to the silent movies I’ve been introduced to here, we’ve seen comedians, plays and concerts here several times a year. I can’t help but be happy and excited to have the Capitol Theatre so close. I hope it opens again one of these days, because I can’t wait to get back. I miss it so much.

Do you have a historic theatre you love to visit? Which one? What do you see there?

Sources:

Wisconsin Historical Society
Madison’s Lost Theaters – The Isthmus
Al Ringling Theater
Overture Center for the Arts
Rapp and Rapp by Charles Ward Rapp

Four New To Me Classic Movies This Week

I have to admit, it hasn’t been a great week for new to me classic movies…help me out here…

Brewster’s Millions, 1945

Monty’s (Dennis O’Keefe) long lost uncle has left him a lot of money in his will. The catch is that he has to spend $1,000,000 in sixty days so he can inherit the $7,000,000 his uncle has left him. Oh, and the will dictates that he can’t give any gifts, support any charities and he has to keep the whole thing to himself.  The uncle’s purpose with the rules is to make sure his nephew gets sick of spending money so that he will always be responsible with the money he’s giving him. It’s an interesting plot to me. Of all the new to me movies I’ve seen this week, Brewster’s Millions was my favorite. It’s a lot of fun and full of clever ways to spend a lot of money. The 1945 film is roughly based on the 1914 version. I haven’t seen that, Have you? I need to see the 1985 version of Brewster’s Millions stars Richard Pryor and John Candy. Have you seen it? Did you like it?

All Through The Night, 1942

The plot – gamblers run amok and discover a cell of Nazis in New York and decide to take them on – is a bit far-fetched for me but the cast is worth the time. Humphrey Bogart, Frank McHugh, Kaaren Verne, Jackie Gleason, William Demarest, Peter Lorre, Phil Silvers, among others, make this movie fun, even if the plot wasn’t completely convincing to me.  Frank McHugh, as usual, just makes me happy. He makes me want to watch this again. His character, which is a version of all the other characters he’s ever played, is such a lovable, clever, funny guy that I can’t help but smile every time I see him. On a side note, McHugh has made five movies with Bogart. That’s a combination I need more of. Here’s the other four: Bullets or Ballots-1936, Swing Your Lady-1938, The Roaring Twenties-1939, Virginia City-1940. I’m feeling a Frank McHugh marathon coming on….

The Italian Job, 1969

I know I’m supposed to love this movie but I didn’t. Michael Caine is often a pleasure to watch, but even he couldn’t make this better for me. It’s supposed to be a comedy about a gang of criminals that try to steal gold by creating a traffic jam. Interesting, but I didn’t laugh as much as I expected when I saw this billed as a comedy. I did, however, admire all the Mini Coopers and amazing driving in this! Wow! The Coopers were driving on roofs, in tunnels and up stairs. I can’t imagine the effort put into the stunt driving here. Do I need to watch this again? What did I miss? I really want to like this. I LOVED the 2003 remake starring Mark Wahlberg and Charlize Theron….

Tony Rome, 1967

No. Just no.

I know, I know.  This one was my least favorite this week. A disappointment, because I wanted to love it. Frank Sinatra is a favorite of mine. Usually. This reminds me of an old Humphrey Bogart detective movie. Except that the Bogart plot is forced on us with a terrible script and bad acting. Even Frank Sinatra’s performance felt forced. I’d much rather spend time with Frank in The Manchurian Candidate, 1962 or Suddenly, 1954.

What made you happy to watch this week? Feel free to let me know what you thought of these movies. Please. I’m still disappointed in Tony Rome…

I hope you’re all safe and well….
xoxo, Sarah

Mr. Blanding’s Builds His Dream House, 1948 – Based On the Book By Eric Hodgins

“Oh this was a joy, sheer heaven from beginning to end,” Myrna Loy said about Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House in her autobiography, Myrna Loy: Being and Becoming

“Acting is like playing ball. You toss the ball and some people don’t toss it back; some people don’t even catch it. When you get somebody [like Myrna] who catches it and tosses it back, that’s really what acting is all about. Myrna kept that spontaneity in her acting, a supreme naturalness that had the effect of distilled dynamite,” Cary Grant for Myrna Loy: Being and Becoming.

The reason I love this movie SO much is the pairing of Cary Grant (Jim Blandings)and Myrna Loy (Muriel Blandings). They’re magical together. (See Wings in the Dark, 1935 and The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer, 1947) They play off each other so well that I never want a story to end when they’re in it. Their mutual respect shows on screen and its feels good to see that displayed effortlessly and authentically like this. Together, they make us laugh, and laugh some more. Mr. Blandings is my version of a perfect movie-watching experience. I only wish I could have seen it on the big screen.

Both the book and movie follow Mr. and Mrs. Blandings as they pursue their dream of moving to the country to raise their girls in the clean air and peaceful atmosphere. He’s a New York City advertising executive that’s stressed out with his job and the cramped quarters of their city apartment. She does her best to make it comfortable for all of them. A peaceful existence in the rural landscape calls to them both. They find what Mr. Blandings calls their “dream home” in a decrepit “antique” house. They can afford it, if they put some work into it.

They buy it. It immediately becomes a money pit with problems. It’s a chaotic, stressful project that causes more grief than they ever imagined it would when they first saw the house and fantasized about their life in it. And the bills. There’s so many bills!

Grant and Loy play their roles so well that all we have to do now is get lost in the story and smile at the way they handle it all. His funny facial expressions expertly show his passion and frustrations, and, as usual, her presence is comforting, beautiful and strong…to BOTH Mr. Blandings and us viewers.

Add Melvyn Douglas to the mix and, boom, MORE smart comedic timing. The script for the film was written by Norman Panama and Melvin Frank. The dialogue and banter is an improvement from that in the book. I’m glad I read the book after I saw the movie. Placing the faces of Cary Grant and Myrna Loy into the characters of the book, I think, made it an easier read.

The Blandings with their architect, Simms (Reginald Denny).

Bottom line: The movie script, the actor’s abilities  and the setting of Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is nothing short of brilliant. It’s funny and uplifting despite the turmoil that comes with building a new house.

There are some differences in the characters from book to movie. Notably, Bill Cole (Douglas), who is a smaller character in the book. narrates and plays a bigger part in the movie. You could say he anchors the whole thing with his narrative observations. Gussie (Louise Beavers), the housekeeper, is an entirely new, and enjoyable character in the movie. Spoiler alert:

Gussie (Louise Beavers) with Betsy (Connie Marshall) and Joan (Sharyn Moffett) Blandings.

She ends up saving the day.

Eric Hodgins published the book in 1946 after he wrote a short story about the home-building process for Fortune Magazine in 1946. Hodgins had a career in magazine publishing starting with the Atlantic in 1926. He was an Associate Editor at Redbook, a Vice President at Time and the publisher at Fortune. This is the only novel he ever wrote.

Each chapter of the book coincides with the chronological steps of the process of buying and rebuilding a dream house. It starts with Mr. and Mrs. Blanding discovering their dream property in Lansdale County, Connecticut (the movie starts in their New York City apartment) and takes us all the way to life in the house after it’s done.  The chaos in between is what both the movie and book are all about. In the book, that chaotic process is trying and full of details. It reads more like a diary than a story. In fact, Hodgins uses Mrs. Blanding’s diary entries to tell a chunk of the story.

The movie treats the chaos with humor and it’s perfect.

Additional Source:

Myrna Loy: Being and Becoming by Myrna Loy

The Hustler, 1961 – Based on the Book By Walter S. Tevis

This is not a story about pool or billiards. It’s a tremendous story about character. Fast Eddie Felson, just happens to be a pool-hustler…

The Hustler, 1961

Walter S. Tevis wrote The Hustler in 1959. The movie, one of Paul Newman‘s first big roles, came in 1961. Both expertly tell Fast Eddie Felson’s  story: He’s a pool-hustler who’s convinced himself that he needs to prove to everyone (and himself) that he’s the best pool player in the country so he can gain the respect and riches he so desperately craves. Eddie tells himself he can beat anyone, Including Minnesota Fats (Jackie Gleason), who is the actual best pool player in the country. We recognize early that maybe Eddie could do it, if he just had the character he doesn’t know he needs to accomplish it. Talent isn’t everything like Eddie thinks it is. He believes beating Minnesota Fats would prove everything. Like the poster says, it’s a hunger that lies within him, and it drives every decision he makes.

“You just want the money. Sure. And the aristocratic pleasure of seeing him fall apart.” – Bert Gordon, calling Eddie out on his lack of character it takes to win.

I don’t like Eddie in the book or the movie.  I’m not supposed to. He has little integrity and no character.  He’s a mouthy, arrogant,  obnoxious brat – one that Paul Newman brings to life brilliantly. The “aw shucks” smiles he invokes to show the emotions Eddie struggles with, and tries to cover up, are perfect. I DO admire, respect and like his adversary, Minnesota Fats (Gleason). It’s evident in HIS manner, language…even the clothes he wears…that this is where the man with real character is. And success.  He’s the one that deserves the respect Eddie can’t seem to achieve. The same thing happens In The Cincinnati Kid, 1965, a remake of The Hustler (in a poker environment instead of a pool hall one), I don’t like the The Cincinnati Kid (Steve McQueen) either, for the same reasons I don’t like Eddie. But I DO admire, respect and like HIS adversary, Lancey Howard (Edward G. Robinson) for the same reasons I like and respect Minnesota Fats in this movie. In The Color of Money, the Martin Scorcese-directed 1986 sequel (not remake) to The Hustler, I don’t like Vincent (Tom Cruise) at all either for, you guessed it, the same reasons. But, I finally DO get a chance to admire, respect and like Eddie Felson (Paul Newman revisits this role) for a little while.

By the way, there was no real Minnesota Fats at that time. The nickname came about after the 1961 movie when a plump pool shark named Rudolf Walter Wanderone, Jr. adapted the nickname for himself from the Jackie Gleason character in the movie.

In the book, Walter S. Tevis gives us vivid descriptions of dark, gritty, urban (and not-so-urban) pool halls that give it a distinct noir feeling. The opening scene of the book takes place at Bennington’s Pool Hall in Chicago and I swear, I could smell the smoke in the air just reading Tevis’s words. Excellent writing like this continues throughout the book and, thankfully, the visuals in the movie live up to every word Tevis writes in the book. Every character is properly placed in the exact atmosphere they should be in both the book and movie. The reader…and viewer…are too. We never feel ourselves cringing at any misplaced dialogue or setting in either one. I always felt like I was there. Listening, watching and very interested in a man that comes full circle in his quest for respect.

The Hustler was directed by Robert Rossen for 20th Century Fox and in addition to Paul Newman, it also starred Jackie Gleason, Piper Laurie and George C. Scott. Newman, Rossen, Gleason and Laurie were all nominated for Academy Awards for their roles. The movie was nominated for 11 Oscars total and won two; one for Best Cinematography and another for Best Art Direction. Director Robert Rossen communicated Tevis’s atmosphere perfectly. The movie follows the book closely, up until the billiards game between Eddie and James Findley (Murray Hamilton) with a few minor exceptions.  It’s then that the book and movie diverge. Bert Gordon’s (George C. Scott) entrance into the story changes things for Eddie. In one way for the book, in another for the movie. The endings are completely different but the same overall message is the same: Character matters.

Sources:

Encylopaedia Britannica – Minnesota Fats
iMDB